Guest Blog: To the Beat of my Book

Article by: Ashley Robinson

book-headphones“I met this girl when I was nine years old and what I love most she has so much soul. She was old school and I was just a shorty never knew that through my life she’d be there for me”. Lyrics from rapper/actor Common’s “I use to love her” paints a perfect picture of childhood love. The same way lyrics can tell a story, it can also inspire or provoke more depth to an author’s tale.

Both arts seem to always coincide. Songs and books create feelings, evoke thought as well as vivid imagery. It allows imagination that is from a consumer standpoint. What about a business standpoint? How do the two arts collide?

Simple, both artists and authors are faced with giving the fans what they want. This isn’t a easy task! Everyone has an opinion just like everyone has an asshole. Face it you’re not going to please everyone.

You’re music and book isn’t for everyone. You’ll have to zone in on your Target Audience. And even then you can’t please everyone. Also, artists and writers are faced with contracts that may or may not affect royalties (payouts). Also, protecting them from plagiarism of any kind.

Note: Authors using song lyrics in books shouldn’t use more than four bars.

What sets the bar any higher for music and books to coexist is the constant song titles or lyric quotes that become urban book titles such as “Love even when it hurts” the song by  Avant then turned into “Love even if it hurts” the book by Tamicka Higgins. You see it’s easy to intertwine the two.

Music can create books but books can create music as well. Song lyrics are made up of vast vocabulary that is either learned from the street and/or book i.e. Webster’s dictionary and/or published sonnets. Artists must have a decent love of words and wordplay to make words rhyme such as wine and time or to elevate complexity with a metaphor such as “You’re immature like roger so go home!” (lyrics from Wale’s Fuck you ). The double meanings in that metaphor is situational and educational via words. Let me explain! The character Roger from the hit 90’s television series Sister, Sister played by Marques Houston was in a singing group called Immature. The word immature in the context meaning child- like. The television show itself is reminiscent of childhood while the person wale is addressing in the song is a level of childish. Wordplay and meanings both affect music and books. But that’s more for another blog, another day.

About the Writer:

Ashley robinson, born at st. agnes hospital in west Baltimore in October 1990 to teen parents paulette and cedric had a stereotypical upbringing. Once her father was incarcerated ashley was raised by mother paulette whom had the support system of her parents elaine and joseph lyle. While mom was at school and/or work or church Ashley found her love of writing at home with her grandmother whom taught her to write and read cursive at the tender age of five so that she was quiet during the young and the restless. Ashleys love for writing grew and her curiousity peeked for words and story telling. At the age of seven she began crafting short stories and poetry that she often present at school for showing tell. Now as an adult and mother of one she wants nothing more then to have her work as a muse for those who want to follow their passion and needs life lessons learned through the pages. Ashley currently resides in maryland where she pre- school teaches, donates to charties, and working toward more entrepurneal affairs. Her debut novel released august 2016 entitled Imani. The series can be currently found on amazon.

Money Trees Publications

Authoress Ashley Robinson

 

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