Authors in Business; 4 Elements to Selling a Book Online

Hello Readers!

I-Wrote-A-BookSo last week on Wednesday I wrote a blog about the five elements to selling a book in a book store. Today I want to talk about the four elements of selling a book online.

If you missed the blog last week, check it out here.

So the question is what makes a person buy a book when they go into a book store. What makes someone pick your book over the hundreds of books that are in the store if they didn’t have the intentions of buying your book?

When we go to an online store such as Books a Million, Barnes and Noble, Amazon or iBooks, we browse in different genres, look for our favorite titles but most times, there are new releases advertised on the home page. Books that are on sale or books that are relevant to your resent searches.

So what are the four elements to selling a book online? Let’s take a look.

  1. It’s going to be the cover/title. That’s for sure. No matter where any reader is, it’s going to be the cover and title that gets the readers attention.
  2. The reader is then going to click on the cover and read the synopsis. The synopsis should be error free and detailed enough to sell the book after the cover.
  3. If the synopsis is good enough for their liking, they are then going to the reviews. Now this can’t be done in a book store, however, readers who are browsing online are going to read the reviews. This is why you want to promote readers to leave reviews. Reviews are extremely important. They can sell your book.
  4. After readers read the reviews and are sold they will do one of two things. They will either download the sample or download the book. 

So in the elements of selling a book online, there are only four but the elements are mostly the same. Make sure the cover can sell. Make sure the synopsis can sell. Make sure readers are leaving reviews. Sell them with the first paragraph or chapter of the book. And if a reader decides to go outside of the book store or the online store, make sure your website sells them. Make sure your social media sites and bios sell you and your work. Cross all your “T’s” and dot all of your “I’s”.

Sell your books in any way you can. All elements are important.

-Your Literary Mentor

Dominique

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How to Tuesday; How to Create the Perfect Pre Release Package

Hello Readers,

book-launchGetting ready to release a book is one of the most exciting things as an author. It doesn’t matter if you’ve released a book before or not, releasing your 100thbook compared to your 20this all the same. It’s like having a new baby even when you already have two.  So, when it comes to getting ready to release a book, it’s always a lot of fun.

There are so many fun things you can do to get ready for the release, book tours, blog tours, cover reveals, pre reviews etc. So how can you create the perfect pre-release package? Let’s discuss.

The first thing to sort out is what exactly you want to surround this release. Do you think doing a cover reveal will be more exciting for your book? Is your cover so captivating that people will want to purchase your book off the cover alone? Do a cover reveal.

What about a book tour? Are readers going to flock to you off your reading and presence that they will want to purchase your book for that reason alone? Do you have a good following? This might be the right move for you.

Blog tours are basically the same thing as a book tour, but from the comfort of your own home. Are you trying to gain new followers? Schedule a blog tour.

But, scheduling events is just the icing on the cake. Simple organizing and being prepared for the release goes a long away. Here are a few things you need to make sure are set in motion before the book releases.

  • Has the book been through several rounds of editing
  • Have you updated your website about your coming book
  • Are all social media platforms ready for the book you’ve been promoting since you’ve been writing
  • Have you created logos and graphics to help promote.
  • Is the cover finished
  • Has the synopsis been created
  • Is your bio updated
  • Have you started contacting the media about your release
  • Have you created a release date
  • Most importantly, have you budgeted for this release

If you can put together good events to surround your book and then put together a well-organized list to prepare for the release, you are well on your way to having the perfect pre-release package.

-Your Literary Mentor

Dominique

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How to Tuesday; How to Pitch to the Literary Industry

Hello Readers and Happy Tuesday!

b2ap3_thumbnail_AdobeStock_143440966-1So how do you pitch to the literary industry? You must first ask yourself, who is the literary industry? Is the literary industry your family and friends? Book stores? Magazines? Websites? Blogs? Who are we in fact pitching to?

When you learn who you are pitching to, you can then find out how to bring your work to their attention.

Let’s say for instance, you are pitching your work to a reviewer. The first thing to do is to go to their website or social media. Do a little research. Read about this person. Then go to their contact me page and read a little more. Do they have requirements for contacting them? Take note of this. More importantly, how do they like to be contacted when someone is inquiring about their services?

Sometimes, when we follow people on social media they will tell us how to contact them from a promotion. They may say, “Send an email, now!” or “Use our contact us page to inquire.”, these are things you need to pay attention to if you are thinking about contacting someone about their services in the future.

Once you have figured out how to contact them, then you want to make sure you know their requirements for being contacted. Are they asking for a press release? Bio? Press Kit? You need to know this so that you don’t send a full length bio instead of a simple byline.

Bottomline, in order to know how to pitch to the literary industry, you must first know how they like to be contacted and what their requirements are.

If you are simply pitching to the literary industry, then you need to know how these particular people receive their news. This is called target marketing. We will save this blog for another day.

-Your Literary Mentor

Dominique

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Using a Business Plan to Help your Literary Career

When people think about Business Plans, they think about starting a new business, needing money to start up this new company and quitting the job they already have. But a business plan is simply a guide to success.

A plan is very important to have in any type of situation or case. We have emergency plans, traveling plans, financial plans. But when it comes to the literary field, having a plan is just as important.

When we start writing books, the only thing on our mind is to have our book published and for someone to read it. We aren’t thinking of ten years from now. We aren’t thinking about marketing or promoting. We just want our book read and we want to reap the benefits from it. Simple as that. But when we start to make a career out of writing books, whether we have a full time job or not, it’s important to have a plan.

To start, you should make a list of short term goals and long term goals. Ask yourself general questions:

  • Where do you see yourself in five years?
  • What do you expect to reap from writing books?
  • Will you always have a full-time job or do you plan to quit and take on writing full-time?
  • Are you financially ready?

These are things to consider. Once you’ve asked yourself a ton of questions and have answers to those questions, it is now time to start making a plan; making those dreams come true.

This will mean that you will have to sacrifice in some places. You may need to do a better job at saving so you can hire a good editor. You may need to start promoting more so more people can get their hands on your book. You may have to spend an extra hour or two at night writing because you get home late from work each night. In anything that you do, it’s going to take hard work and sacrifice. But ask yourself, doesn’t the dream ahead sound well worth the sacrifice right now? Sure, it does! So, use this motivation to push ahead.

Your plan should not be tedious. It shouldn’t be hard in any kind of way and it should be attainable. Also, give yourself short term goals you can meet once a week or every month. Like spending a little more time researching an illustrator or editor, using your lunch break to eat and write, putting away twenty extra dollars each month. It’s all possible!

Consider your literary career a part time career. All of this hard work is a means to an end-beginning. Start creating a Business plan for your literary career so you can see your dreams come true!

-Your Literary Mentor

www.diamondmpresspublications.com